Lustige Bilder

The Best Cities for Vegan Travelers3 min read

Vegan Meals Carrot Dog

Traveling as a vegan requires a lot of planning. Unlike some travelers, you usually can’t just play it by ear and hope that whatever restaurant you choose on the spur of the moment will have vegan options.  You have to research restaurants, browse menus, and ultimately figure out what best fits your lifestyle. Unfortunately, this also means that your options can be quite limited in some places.

But with veganism on the rise, more and more cities are able to cater to those who follow this plant-based lifestyle.  So before you book your next trip, why not choose a destination that doesn’t require so much planning or limit your choices? Below we’ve compiled a list of five of the most vegan-friendly cities so your next vacation can be a little less limiting and a lot more stress-free.

Portland, Oregon

Unsurprisingly, this hip city was dubbed America’s #1 Vegan-Friendly City of 2016 by PETA, and many vegan visitors can easily see why. In addition to a plethora of vegan bars and restaurants throughout the city, Portland is home to vegan grocery stores, clothing shops, tattoo parlors, and even a 100% vegan shopping mall. Travelers can shop, dine, and experience Portland without even having to think about what is or isn’t cruelty-free.

Vegan Food Portland

Berlin, Germany

Though Portland tops PETA’s list of U.S. cities, Berlin is quickly becoming the international mecca of all things vegan. Famous for its trendy art scene and vibrant culture, the German capital has over fifty purely vegan restaurants. Traveling with someone who isn’t vegan? Not to worry. The majority of Berlin’s other restaurants still offer plenty of vegan options so you can both get what you’re looking for. If you’re thinking about planning a trip, consider going in August when the city holds its annual Vegan Summer Festival to promote and celebrate the cruelty-free lifestyle.

Tel Aviv, Israel

If Berlin’s vegan festival has piqued your interest, you should check out what Tel Aviv has in store. The most progressive city in the Middle East in terms of veganism, Tel Aviv hosts the largest vegan festival in the world every September. Approximately 1 in every 20 residents of this beach city is vegan, and this number is only increasing as dairy products continue to lose popularity. The city’s signature vegan specialty? The “carrot dog” – a smoked carrot marinated in Jack Daniels and served in a warm bun.

Chennai, India

Considering that about half of the Indian population lives a meat-free lifestyle, it’s certainly no surprise to see Chennai on this list. Located in the south of India, Chennai boasts a wide selection of vegan foods ranging from curries to dosas. Whether you want a five-star dining experience at one of the country’s best rated vegan restaurants or just a quick bite to eat from a street cart, you’ll have plenty of options to choose from.
Vegan Indian Food

London, England

London’s meat-free history dates back to the 18th century when many members of British society converted to vegetarianism. Since then, London has become a great place for vegetarians and vegans alike, with the vegan population more than tripling in the last decade alone. Among that population is a former KFC employee-turned-vegan who recently opened Temple of Hackney, the world’s first meat-free fried “chicken” shop.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - June 5, 2017 at 22:23

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Uh Oh, I Gotta Go! How to Deal with Traveler’s Diarrhea3 min read

Dealing with Traveler's Diarrhea

Okay, so it might not be the most fun thing to talk about, but every traveler should be prepared for the possibility of getting traveler’s diarrhea. Traveler’s diarrhea is a stomach and intestinal infection primarily caused by bacterial pathogens. Often, the infection is spread as a result of improper handling of food or through contaminated water. The risk is particularly high in the developing world and in countries in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America; as many as 50 percent of travelers to the developing world develop traveler’s diarrhea. While most natives have developed immunity to the bacteria because of constant exposure, visitors can easily become ill. If you’re planning to travel to any of these places, it’s important to understand how to prevent and treat it.

I don’t want traveler’s diarrhea ruining my trip. How can I avoid it?

No one wants to spend a vacation, study abroad, or service trip in discomfort. Thankfully, because traveler’s diarrhea is largely caused by sanitation issues, it can usually be avoided. To minimize your risk of developing traveler’s diarrhea, keep these things in mind:

  • Use bottled water for drinking and brushing teeth. If you don’t have access to bottled water, you can treat your own water by boiling it for a few minutes.
  • Wash your hands regularly and practice good hygiene.
  • Keep your mouth closed while showering.
  • Don’t swim in bodies of water than may be contaminated.
  • Avoid raw or undercooked meat or seafood.
  • Be cautious with salads, fruits, and vegetables that may have been washed with contaminated water. Stick to fruits that you can peel yourself.
  • Avoid unpasteurized milk and dairy products.
  • Don’t buy food from street vendors. The unsanitary conditions that this food is often cooked in can greatly increase your risk.
  • Eat foods that are freshly cooked and served hot.
  • Don’t use ice cubes.

If you are still concerned, you may want to start taking Pepto-Bismol prophylactically to help prevent traveler’s diarrhea. Taking two tabs four times a day can notably decrease the chances of developing traveler’s diarrhea. Keep in mind, however, that this can also lead to constipation and should not be done for extended periods of time.

Oh no! I don’t feel so good…

Unfortunately, even when practicing the best preventive tactics, there is still a chance that you can contract traveler’s diarrhea. If you begin to feel ill, look out for these specific symptoms to determine if you have it:

  • Abrupt onset of diarrhea and the urgent need to use the toilet
  • Fever
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Bloating
  • Weakness and discomfort
  • Gas
  • Cramps
  • Loss of appetite

So what do I do now?

If you think you’ve developed traveler’s diarrhea, there’s good news: most cases resolve themselves within a few days and without treatment. That being said, even just a few days of discomfort and pain can really put a damper on your trip. To lessen the symptoms and help your body fight the bacteria, make sure you stay very hydrated and consume a lot of salt to replace the lost electrolytes. You may also wish to consider an anti-mobility medication to slow the frequency of diarrhea. In severe cases (three or more loose stools in fewer than 8 hours in addition to vomiting, nausea, or blood) medical attention should be sought, as antibiotics could be necessary.

Don’t let traveler’s diarrhea ruin your time away. Follow these tips and talk to your doctor before you go to make sure you have a safe and healthy trip.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - June 2, 2017 at 01:20

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FDA approves first generic Strattera for the treatment of ADHD

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first generic versions of Strattera (atomoxetine) to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in pediatric and adult patients.
ADHD / ADD News From Medical News Today

Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 31, 2017 at 17:17

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Layover in Luxury: The Best Airports for Layovers and How to Make the Most of Them3 min read

Layover Munich Internation Airport

When most of us fly, we do everything we can to avoid a layover. Spending endless hours in some dreary airport terminal sounds like an absolute nightmare. But in some airports throughout the world, the experience isn’t always so terrible. In fact, some are so swanky that you might find yourself looking for flights with a layover on purpose. Below, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most luxurious airports in the world so you know where to go to make the most of your next layover.

Singapore Changi Airport (SIN)

Rooftop Pool Layover Singapore Changi AirportConsistently at the top of the list of best airports, Changi Airport takes layovers to an entirely different level. With full service spas, a rooftop swimming pool, 24-hour cinemas, cultural activities and even a butterfly garden, Singapore’s major airport is a travel destination in itself. If all they have still isn’t enough to occupy you, the airport offers free tours of the city center for passengers with 6+ hour layovers. Don’t forget to take a picture with the Merlion, Singapore’s national icon, on your excursion.

Incheon International Airport (ICN)

The world’s biggest duty-free shopping spot, this South Korean airport is yet another great destination for layovers. Visitors can pass the time between flights by taking laps around the ice skating rink, seeing a live play or concert, playing a few holes of golf, or exploring the Korean Cultural Museum. And once again, if you’re sick of being stuck within the confines of an airport and want a taste of life in South Korea, you can sign up for ICN’s complimentary city tour and go see Seoul’s most famous sites like Yonggungsa Temple or Myeongdong market.

Zurich Airport (ZRH)

Layover Zurich International AirportSwitzerland’s largest airport, ZHR is an ideal layover location for the adventurous traveler. Stay active
between flights by renting sports equipment like bikes, skates, or Nordic walking poles, or watch takeoffs and landings up close from one of the many observation decks. If you have time to spare, head to the city center just eight miles away and check out the Swiss National Museum or Lake Zurich. If you’re on a time crunch or would rather see the sights from a bird’s-eye view, sign up for the airport’s sightseeing flights instead.

Hong Kong International Airport (HKG)

The Chinese capital’s airport is on this list for a few reasons. Built on an artificial island off the coast of Hong Kong, HKG is home to the country’s largest IMAX Theater, an aviation discovery center, a nine-hole golf course, and a variety of sports simulators. If your layover allows enough time to visit the city, the Airport Express will take you directly there. We suggest then hopping on a bus to Victoria’s Peak, where you can get an Instagram-worthy view of the entire city before catching your next flight.

Munich International Airport (MUC)

In true German fashion, Munich International Airport’s biggest claim to fame is Airbräu Biergarten, their on-site beer garden featuring beer from an in-house brewery (pictured above.) Not a big beer fan? Not to worry. There are plenty of other things to do, including a helicopter ride, mini golf, and even surf lessons. If you’re there around the holidays be sure to check out their annual Christkindl Market. And if you have time to leave the airport, the city center is just 17.7 miles away and filled with plenty to do including the shopping and restaurants at Marienplatz, Munich’s central square.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 30, 2017 at 20:34

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Traveling with Heart Disease: Tips for Staying Healthy2 min read

Traveling with Heart Disease

Traveling is stressful in general, and for those with heart disease it can pose an even bigger challenge. But having heart problems doesn’t necessarily mean you have to miss out on the next family vacation or island getaway. With proper preparation and care, travelers with heart disease can easily enjoy a comfortable and healthy vacation alongside their loved ones. Here are some tips to ensure a heart-healthy trip.

Talk to Your Doctor Before You Go

If you experience any unusual symptoms, have had a recent procedure or hospitalization, or have an irregular heartbeat, be sure to visit your doctor prior to your departure.  He or she will let you know if it is safe to travel and, in some cases, provide you with a copy of a recent EKG test to bring with you.

Prepare Your Medications

Make sure to pack enough medication for the entire trip as well as for a few extra days in case of delays or cancelations. If you are flying, keep your medication in your carry-on bag so that it is easily accessible at all times. Be sure that all medications are properly labeled and that you have access to water (and food if necessary) when it is time to take them.

Plan Ahead

Once you’ve talked to your doctor and prepared your medications, there are a few other key things you can do before departure to eliminate health risks:

  • Pack using suitcases on wheels to avoid heavy lifting.
  • If flying, request an aisle seat so you can get up and move when necessary.
  • If traveling overseas, arrange for a day of rest after arrival.
  • Arrive to the airport, train station, or bus depot early to avoid crowds.
  • Pack plenty of healthy snacks and water (if flying, buy water bottles once you get through security).
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.

Avoid Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT)

For people with heart conditions, sitting for extended periods of time can increase the risk of swelling in your legs and blood clots. Flying adds to this risk because of lower oxygen levels on the plane. To avoid DVT:

  • Try to move every 2 hours or so. If driving, stop the car and take a walk. If flying, walk around the cabin. If you cannot get up and walk, move your feet around for several minutes while seated.
  • Wear comfortable shoes and socks.
  • If flying for more than 8 hours, wear compression stockings. 

Take Proper Precautions If You Have a Pacemaker or ICD

If flying with a pacemaker or implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD), make sure you carry your device ID on you and inform a TSA agent. It is safe to walk through most metal detectors and full body scanners now, but you should not permit a hand-held metal detector to be used near your device. If you are unsure of what is safe in your situation, it may be best to ask a TSA agent for a hand search.

Get Travel Health Insurance

If you follow these tips, you should have a comfortable and problem-free trip. However, in the off chance that medical assistance is needed, it’s important to have a travel health insurance plan that covers hospital or doctor visits, prescription drugs, and medical evaluations.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 19, 2017 at 19:40

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The Airline Laptop Ban: What You Need to Know Right Now2 min read

Laptop Ban on Airline Flights

Air travel to the United States soon could become much more inconvenient if an expected expansion of the ban on laptop computers goes into effect. Officials from the Department of Homeland Security are meeting to discuss banning all laptop computers and larger electronic devices from carry-on baggage for any flight departing from Europe to the United States.

Here’s what you need to know right now about the ban.

Terrorism Created the Need for a Laptop Ban

ISIS, al Qaeda, and other terrorist organizations are growing more sophisticated in the weapons they use. U.S. officials now believe that terrorists have figured out ways to plant explosives in laptop computers and other larger electronic devices that could be carried on to an airplane.

According to the FBI, these terrorist organizations have obtained airport security equipment that allows them to test their concealment methods. The FBI also believes that some of these explosives are able to make their way through commonly used airport security screeners.

Detonating these devices is more difficult to do remotely, so forcing travelers to store laptops and electronic devices in checked luggage instead of carry-on bags may help to reduce risks.

A Laptop Ban is Already in Effect in Some Places

There is already a similar ban in effect in 10 airports across eight countries. The proposed expansion would extend this ban to all of Europe.

Currently, travelers departing from the following airports to the United States must check laptops and electronic devices:

  • Istanbul, Turkey
  • Dubai and Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates
  • Doha, Qatar
  • Amman, Jordan
  • Cairo, Egypt
  • Casablanca, Morocco
  • Jeddah and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Kuwait City, Kuwait

The ban is also in effect for travelers flying non-stop to the United States on any of the following airlines: EgyptAir, Emirates, Etihad Airways, Kuwait Airways, Qatar Airways, Royal Air Maroc, Royal Jordanian, Saudia (Saudi Arabian Airlines), and Turkish Airlines.

The Expansion of the Ban is Likely

It seems likely that the ban will expand and potentially continue expanding as new threats are uncovered. In a statement given to The Daily Beast, the Department of Homeland Security said:

“No final decisions have been made on expanding the restriction on large electronic devices in aircraft cabins; however, it is under consideration. DHS continues to evaluate the threat environment and will make changes when necessary to keep air travelers safe.”

Last month, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly told a congressional committee that the threat behind the ban is “real and getting realer,” and added, “we may take measures in the not-too-distant future to expand the number of airports.”

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 11, 2017 at 21:23

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Healthy Recipe: Peruvian Adobo Pulled Pork with Polenta2 min read

Peruvian Adobo Pulled Pork with Polenta

Peruvian Adobo Pulled Pork with PolentaPeruvian cuisine incorporates a variety of influences from Europe as well as the indigenous Inca population. One of the staples, corn, serves as a hearty gluten free grain accompaniment in this recipe, perfect for soaking up all the delicious cooking liquid from the pork. Polenta has a low glycemic index, and is rich in vitamins A and C. Braising a pork shoulder slowly turns a cheap cut of meat into something worthy of company, and allows all the flavors from the chipotle peppers and adobo sauce to really permeate the meat. Pork provides ample amounts of protein, and also offers iron and potassium, while being leaner than red meat. This dish holds well overnight, so feel free to make it in advance. The pulled pork is also a great freezer meal option.

Serves: 6 with leftovers

Total Time: 4 hours (active time: 30 minutes)

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 pound boneless pork shoulder or pork butt
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 yellow onion, peeled and diced
  • 6 garlic cloves, peeled and diced
  • 1 tablespoon ground cumin
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons adobo sauce
  • 1- 24 oz. can chopped tomatoes
  • 2 bay leaves
  • ¼ – ½ cup water
  • 1 cup polenta
  • 3 cups vegetable stock
  • ½ cup shredded cheddar (optional)
  • Fresh chopped cilantro, to serve

Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. In a large Dutch oven, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the pork, and season the top side with salt and pepper. Sear for 5-6 minutes until golden brown. Flip to the other side, and season again with salt and pepper.
  2. Add the onions, garlic, and ground cumin, and sauté for 2-3 minutes. Deglaze with the apple cider vinegar. Add the chipotle peppers, adobo sauce, chopped tomatoes, bay leaves, and water. Stir well to combine. Cover and put in the oven.
  3. Allow to cook for 1 hour, then flip the pork over and stir the liquid. If the liquid seems low (less that ½ way up the pork) add more water or vegetable stock as needed. Cook the pork for another hour, and flip it again. Cook the pork for a final 30 minutes to 1 hour, until its completely falling apart and shreds easily when pressed.
  4. Shred the pork using two forks and mix it into the sauce. Season to taste with a splash of apple cider vinegar and salt and pepper as needed.
  5. To cook the polenta, bring 3 cups of vegetable stock up to a boil in a large pan. Whisk in the polenta, and stir constantly for 5 minutes. It will soak up all the stock. Add the shredded cheddar, and a pinch of salt and pepper.
  6. Serve the pulled pork alongside the polenta, garnished with the chopped fresh cilantro. Enjoy!

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 10, 2017 at 18:17

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Are You Too Sick to Fly? Knowing When to Reschedule Your Trip3 min read

Are you too sick to fly

The dream vacation you’ve planned for over a year is a few days away and you’ve got the worst flu of your life. Or, maybe you’ve been away from home on a two-week business trip and all you want is your own bed – but you’re finding it nearly impossible to get out of the hotel bed because you’re so sick. It can be tempting to try to show a little grit and get on that flight no matter what, but there are sometimes you just shouldn’t fly. When your health is at risk – or you’re putting the health of your fellow passengers at risk – knowing when to reschedule is important.

When It’s OK to Fly

There are times when you’re not feeling 100 percent but it’s still OK to fly. This includes:

  • Traveler’s diarrhea: The dreaded Montezuma’s Revenge is definitely uncomfortable and potentially embarrassing. However, you won’t be putting your health or the health of your fellow passengers at risk if you fly. This one is your call. If you are having stomach issues, taking an over the counter anti-diarrheal medication can help you make it through the uncomfortable hours in economy class.
  • You have a sinus infection or cold: If you’re feeling sinus pressure and cold symptoms at sea level, expect them to get worse once you’re at altitude in the airplane. However, there are no restrictions on flying with a cold, but you should take some precautions to protect yourself and others. Take a decongestant before flying, cover your mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing, and bring hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes to clean your area before leaving.
  • You’re hungover: They say “what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” unless of course it’s a hangover. That’s coming home with you if you’ve had too much fun the night before your flight. You can still fly but you’ll likely feel terrible. Do your best to rehydrate your body before the flight and stay hydrated while you’re in the air. If your stomach can handle it, eating can help with the queasy feeling.
  • You’re injured: If you have a broken bone or a sprain, you can still fly. Let the airline know beforehand if you need a wheelchair or other special assistance to help with your mobility in the airport.

When You Should Not Fly

Don’t fly when you’re dealing with any of the following illnesses:

  • You’ve had surgery recently: Doctors recommend waiting 10 to 14 days after surgery before flying. These guidelines are especially important to follow if you’ve had abdominal, chest, head or throat surgery, since pressure changes during flight can cause complications. Abdominal surgery also puts you at greater risk for clotting, which can be made worse by flying.
  • You have a high fever: A fever below 100 degrees Fahrenheit is fine, but anything higher should keep you grounded, according to the Centers for Disease Control. If your fever is accompanied by other symptoms like vomiting and diarrhea, you should cancel your trip.
  • You have the flu: Remarkably, many people fly with the flu. If you do this, you’re putting your fellow passengers at risk since a cough or sneeze can spread the flu virus as far as six feet away. If you have obvious symptoms of the flu, don’t be surprised if the gate agent denies boarding.

As a general rule of thumb, let your body and common sense be your guide about when you’re too sick to fly. If you have travel health insurance, you’ll be able to reschedule your trip and find the medical treatment you need if you’re stuck somewhere away from home.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 9, 2017 at 15:20

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Traveling with Fibromyalgia: 5 Tips to Make Your Trip Successful3 min read

Traveling with fibromyalgia

Traveling when you’re perfectly healthy can be hard on your body. When you have chronic pain caused by fibromyalgia, it can be grueling. You’ll have to deal with lots of walking through the airport, cramped seating, time changes and irregular schedules, food you’re not familiar with, and a bed that’s not your own. If you’re not careful, any one of these challenges could trigger a fibromyalgia (FM) flare-up that could ruin your trip.

However, with a little planning and help from your travel companions, you can have a successful trip. These tips will help you anticipate some of the potential triggers you’ll encounter during your trip, and how to avoid them or deal with them while you’re traveling.

Changes in the Weather and Temperature

Many people with FM are extremely sensitive to temperatures and changes in the weather. While it’s not always possible to avoid the conditions when you’re traveling – especially if it involves another climate or time zone – you can prepare. And remember that airports can be cold since they crank the air conditioning – I myself spent an uncomfortable 2-hour layover shivering in SFO.

Tip: Like the Boy Scouts – always come prepared. Have a light jacket available at all times in the bag you’ll be carrying with you, so you can pull it out as soon as you need it. Layers are your friend.

Stress

Stress is one of the biggest FM triggers and there’s no shortage of it when you travel. Delayed flights, missing baggage, sick kids – they can all get your heart rate going. Again, these may be unavoidable but remember, as Jack Sparrow said in Pirates of the Caribbean – “The problem is not the problem. The problem is our attitude about the problem.”

Tip: Let some things go when you’re traveling. If you miss a flight, there will always be another one. Remember your deep breathing exercises and forewarn your travel companions that you may need to take some time for yourself to practice them.

Lack of Sleep

You won’t have access to your regular bed and you may have a time change to deal with as well. These factors, combined with the general hustle and bustle of traveling, can lead to missed sleep – a big no-no if you have FM. Know going into the trip that you’re going to have to make sleep a priority.

Tip: Many FM sufferers find it beneficial to bring a thin roll of foam on a trip to smooth out the lumps and bumps of a strange bed. You may also need to schedule a few naps and regular bedtimes, even if it means missing an excursion with your travel companions or some late-night fun. Avoiding an FM flare-up is worth it.

Breaks in Your Treatment Plan

Anything that breaks your normal treatment plan can put you at risk for an FM flare-up. This includes changes to your routine, which the tips above will help you to avoid. But it also includes missing doses of your prescribed medications and other therapeutic approaches you use on a regular basis.

Tip: Make sure you stock up on the medications you’ll need before leaving for your trip, and search online for pharmacies at your destination in case you need them. You can also ask your doctor for recommendations for service providers – such as therapeutic massage therapists and acupuncturists – who can help alleviate symptoms and keep your fibromyalgia management on track.

Image courtesy of The New York Times.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 8, 2017 at 20:17

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Traveling with Fibromyalgia: 5 Tips to Make Your Trip Successful3 min read

Fibromyalgia yoga

Traveling when you’re perfectly healthy can be hard on your body. When you have chronic pain caused by fibromyalgia, it can be grueling. You’ll have to deal with lots of walking through the airport, cramped seating, time changes and irregular schedules, food you’re not familiar with, and a bed that’s not your own. If you’re not careful, any one of these challenges could trigger a fibromyalgia (FM) flare-up that could ruin your trip.

However, with a little planning and help from your travel companions, you can have a successful trip. These tips will help you anticipate some of the potential triggers you’ll encounter during your trip, and how to avoid them or deal with them while you’re traveling.

Changes in the Weather and Temperature

Many people with FM are extremely sensitive to temperatures and changes in the weather. While it’s not always possible to avoid the conditions when you’re traveling – especially if it involves another climate or time zone – you can prepare. And remember that airports can be cold since they crank the air conditioning – I myself spent an uncomfortable 2-hour layover shivering in SFO.

Tip: Like the Boy Scouts – always come prepared. Have a light jacket available at all times in the bag you’ll be carrying with you, so you can pull it out as soon as you need it. Layers are your friend.

Stress

Stress is one of the biggest FM triggers and there’s no shortage of it when you travel. Delayed flights, missing baggage, sick kids – they can all get your heart rate going. Again, these may be unavoidable but remember, as Jack Sparrow said in Pirates of the Caribbean – “The problem is not the problem. The problem is our attitude about the problem.”

Tip: Let some things go when you’re traveling. If you miss a flight, there will always be another one. Remember your deep breathing exercises and forewarn your travel companions that you may need to take some time for yourself to practice them.

Lack of Sleep

You won’t have access to your regular bed and you may have a time change to deal with as well. These factors, combined with the general hustle and bustle of traveling, can lead to missed sleep – a big no-no if you have FM. Know going into the trip that you’re going to have to make sleep a priority.

Tip: Many FM sufferers find it beneficial to bring a thin roll of foam on a trip to smooth out the lumps and bumps of a strange bed. You may also need to schedule a few naps and regular bedtimes, even if it means missing an excursion with your travel companions or some late-night fun. Avoiding an FM flare-up is worth it.

Breaks in Your Treatment Plan

Anything that breaks your normal treatment plan can put you at risk for an FM flare-up. This includes changes to your routine, which the tips above will help you to avoid. But it also includes missing doses of your prescribed medications and other therapeutic approaches you use on a regular basis.

Tip: Make sure you stock up on the medications you’ll need before leaving for your trip, and search online for pharmacies at your destination in case you need them. You can also ask your doctor for recommendations for service providers – such as therapeutic massage therapists and acupuncturists – who can help alleviate symptoms and keep your fibromyalgia management on track.

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Posted by Lustige Bilder - May 5, 2017 at 16:20

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